• facebook
Author: The Editors
E-mail: ppsy@marszalek.com.pl
Institution: Polish Political Science Yearbook (Poland)
Year of publication: 2018
Source: Show
Pages: 1-4
DOI Number: -
PDF: ppsy/47-1/toc.pdf

Abstract:

Polish Political Science Yearbook, 47(1). Published online: March 31, 2018. The Polish Political Science Yearbook is international peer-reviewed journal indexed in: American Bibliography of Slavic and East European Studies (ABSEES) Online, BazHum, Central and Eastern European Online Library, Central European Journal of Social Sciences and Humanities (cejsh.icm.edu.pl), Columbia International Affairs Online, Cosmos Impact Factor, Directory of Open Access Journals, Electronic Journals Library, ERIH Plus, Gale PowerSearch, Google Scholar, HeinOnline, IBR – International Bibliography of Book Reviews of Scholarly Literature on the Humanities and Social Sciences, IBZ – International Bibliography of Periodical Literature on the Humanities and Social Sciences, ICI Journals Master List, International Political Science Abstracts, Open Academic Journals Index, POL-Index (Polska Bibliografia Naukowa) and The Lancaster Index.

Tags: 2018 issue 1 volume 47 table of contents polish political science yearbook ppsy

Continue reading

Author: Robert Kłaczyński
E-mail: robert.klaczynski@up.krakow.pl
Institution: Pedagogical University of Kraków (Poland)
Year of publication: 2018
Source: Show
Pages: 7–19
DOI Number: http://dx.doi.org/10.15804/ppsy2018101
PDF: ppsy/47-1/ppsy2018101.pdf

Abstract:

The paper addresses problems related to energy policies pursued by Central European countries. It identifies the amounts of energy resources in individual countries in the Visegrád Group as well as the transmission infrastructures they use for natural gas and crude oil. The author discusses projects aimed at diversifying energy supplies which are of key importance to V4 countries. The article also presents relations between those countries in both within the group and bilaterally. When outlining prospects of a V4 energy strategy, the account is taken of such vital aspects as relations with the Russian Federation and the contribution made by Visegrád countries to EU actions designed to develop a single energy market.

Tags: crude oil natural gas energy policy energy security

Continue reading

Author: Krystyna Gomółka
E-mail: Krystyna.Gomolka@zie.pg.edu.pl
Institution: Gdańsk University of Technology (Poland)
Year of publication: 2018
Source: Show
Pages: 20–38
DOI Number: http://dx.doi.org/10.15804/ppsy2018102
PDF: ppsy/47-1/ppsy2018102.pdf

Abstract:

Since gaining independence, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan gradually opened their markets to foreign investors. Before Poland’s accession to the European Union, the activities of Polish investors in Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan were based on bilateral treaties concluded by Poland with those countries. Later, except Turkmenistan, they were governed by the partnership and cooperation agreements between the European Communities and their Member States. Despite the ample investment opportunities and favourable conditions for access to the market, the activity of Polish companies in these markets has not produced a significant effect. Poland invested with more considerable success on the markets in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan. It made investment attempts in Tajikistan and Uzbekistan, leaving out Turkmenistan. The reason why Poland has a weak position in these markets is the distance between the partners and inability of Polish companies to effectively compete with large multinational companies which have been operating there for years. In the Kazakh market, good investment prospects are available for waste management, petrochemical, mining and road construction companies. In Kyrgyzstan, there are cooperation possibilities in the area of modern agricultural and processing technologies and establishment of fruit and vegetable processing enterprises. In Tajikistan, enterprises can invest in petroleum and natural gas extraction and exploitation, the fuel market, processing of precious metals and construction of conventional and hydroelectric power plants. In Turkmenistan, Polish companies can compete for road, railway and housing construction contracts, whereas in Uzbekistan they can invest in businesses covered by government tax reductions.

Tags: investments direct investments Kazakhstan Kyrgyzstan Tajikistan Turkmenistan The Republic of Uzbekistan Poland

Continue reading

Author: Oskar J. Chmiel
E-mail: oskar.chmiel@uwr.edu.pl
Institution: University of Wrocław (Poland)
Year of publication: 2018
Source: Show
Pages: 39–53
DOI Number: http://dx.doi.org/10.15804/ppsy2018103
PDF: ppsy/47-1/ppsy2018103.pdf

Abstract:

In times of increasing significance for national policies which support international economic cooperation, a special role is played by state trade support institutions (TSIs). This paper investigates whether such TSIs can be said to operate effectively, through an analysis of one essential element of the support provided to domestic entrepreneurs, namely export recommendations. The recommendations provided by Polish TSIs in respect of Turkey is employed as a case study. The theory of comparative advantage along with a neo-institutional perspective provide the conceptual framing for this analysis, in conjunction with both desk research, document analysis, and selected economic indices. Factors such as trade potential, comparative advantages, and the competitiveness of selected product groups exported by Polish firms to Turkey were also taken into account. The findings largely indicate that TSI export recommendations are adequate, and the majority of the recommended industries demonstrated considerable sales opportunities. Nevertheless, some discrepancies were also noted, which should be an issue for further investigation by both researchers and TSI analysts. Furthermore, the case study in this paper demonstrates that the choices within economic promotion policy – despite its partition between variously-oriented TSIs - were made on the basis of economic rationality.

 

Tags: institutional coherence international competitiveness international entrepreneurship foreign market information trade support institutions Turkey Poland

Continue reading

Author: Edyta Pietrzak
E-mail: edyta.pietrzak@p.lodz.pl
Institution: Łódź University of Technology (Poland)
Year of publication: 2018
Source: Show
Pages: 54–66
DOI Number: http://dx.doi.org/10.15804/ppsy2018104
PDF: ppsy/47-1/ppsy2018104.pdf

Abstract:

The article presents the entitled fields in the framework of their mutual influence. The notion of the public sphere is valuable for understanding the role that civil society plays in transitional justice processes. However transitional justice often reduces the idea of civil society to NGOs and ignores the social movements and civic engagement in the public realm that can be perceived as integral to the creation of new cases for understanding justice in transition. This fact results in the lack of perception of the civil society place in transitional justice processes. Thus the presented paper is based on hermeneutics, critical discourse analysis and dialogue between various theoretical approaches.

 

Tags: public sphere civil society transitional justice

Continue reading

Author: Loretta C. Salajan
E-mail: l.c.salajan@gmail.com
Institution: Vasile Goldis Western University in Arad (Romania)
Year of publication: 2018
Source: Show
Pages: 67–76
DOI Number: http://dx.doi.org/10.15804/ppsy2018105
PDF: ppsy/47-1/ppsy2018105.pdf

Abstract:

This paper analyses Romania’s foreign policy during the first post-communist years, by employing a theoretical viewpoint based on ontological security and trauma. It uncovers the elite efforts to secure the post-totalitarian state’s identity and international course. Romania’s search for ontological security featured the articulation of narratives of victimhood, which were linked with its proclaimed western European identity. The Romanian identity narrative has long struggled between “the West” and “the East”, trying to cope with traumatic historical events. These discursive themes and ontological insecurities were crystallized in the controversy surrounding the Romanian-Soviet “Friendship Treaty” (1991). Key Romanian officials displayed different typical responses to cultural trauma and debated the state’s path to ontological security, which was reflected in the foreign policy positions. 

 

Tags: identity trauma post–communism Romanian and Bulgarian Migration foreign policy ontological security

Continue reading

Author: Michał Lubina
E-mail: michal.lubina@uj.edu.pl
Institution: Jagiellonian University in Kraków (Poland)
Year of publication: 2018
Source: Show
Pages: 77–96
DOI Number: http://dx.doi.org/10.15804/ppsy2018106
PDF: ppsy/47-1/ppsy2018106.pdf

Abstract:

Burma/Myanmar seems to be a perfect ground for transitional justice with both long-failed transitions to democracy that seemed to succeed in 2015 finally and smouldering civil war taking place there since 1948 (since the 1990s limited to Borderlands). Unfortunately, the political realities in Burma/Myanmar make it unlikely, if not impossible, for transitional justice to be applicable in Burma/Myanmar. The victorious in 2015 elections democratic opposition party, National League for Democracy (NLD) came to power thanks to the political deal with the former military government and is consequently being forced to cohabitate politically with the army that still holds critical political checks over the government. It made NLD’s leader, Aung San Suu Kyi to conduct moderate domestic policy without trying to charge the generals for their former crimes. In this circumstances, transitional justice is unwanted by mainstream political actors (NLD, the army) and seen as threatening to peace by many in the Myanmar society. This approach firmly places Burma/Myanmar on one side of the ‘peace vs justice’ dilemma. It answers the “torturer problem”, one of the central problems of transitional justice – how to deal with members of the previous regime which violated human rights – in ‘old fashion’ way, by granting them full amnesty. As such Burma/Myanmar case also falsifies an optimistic claim that transitional justice is necessary for political reforms.

Tags: Burma Myanmar transitional justice transitional justice in Burma/Myanmar Aung San Suu Kyi torturer’s problem

Continue reading

Author: Grażyna Baranowska
E-mail: baranowska.g@gmail.com
Institution: Polish Academy of Sciences (Poland)
Author: Aleksandra Gliszczyńska-Grabias
E-mail: a.gliszczynska@poczta.onet.pl
Institution: Polish Academy of Sciences (Poland)
Year of publication: 2018
Source: Show
Pages: 97–109
DOI Number: http://dx.doi.org/10.15804/ppsy2018107
PDF: ppsy/47-1/ppsy2018107.pdf

Abstract:

The “right to truth” relates to the obligation of the state to provide information about the circumstances surrounding serious violations of human rights. Despite its increasing recognition, the concept raises questions as to its scope and implementation as well as its existence as a free-standing right. Similarly, “memory laws” relate to the way states deal with their past. However, there are certain „memory laws” that, while officially serving as a guarantee for accessing historical truth, lead to its deformation. As a result, an “alternative” truth, based on the will of the legislators, is being imposed. In this article, the authors elaborate on the general nature of the new legal phenomenon of the „right to truth”, as a tool of transitional justice, in particular in the context of both providing and abusing historical truth by the legislators, through the instrument of “memory laws”.

 

Tags: memory laws right to truth Ukraine Poland Russia

Continue reading

Author: Robert Gawłowski
E-mail: robert.gawlowski@wsb.bydgoszcz.pl
Institution: WSB University in Toruń (Poland)
Year of publication: 2018
Source: Show
Pages: 110–120
DOI Number: http://dx.doi.org/10.15804/ppsy2018108
PDF: ppsy/47-1/ppsy2018108.pdf

Abstract:

Co-production of public services is an increasingly popular tool in public management, although it is still a new phenomenon in Poland. Despite the attention researchers give to co-production, some significant gaps remain. In this article, the author attempts to examine the legal possibility of implementing co-production by the Polish local government by local initiative and Solecki Fund. The article aims to examine how major Polish cities gathered in Union in Polish Metropolises used local initiatives. The next step in research is to find out how Solecki Fund is spread among rural areas according to statistical data. It is proved that only a handful of local governments in Poland are truly engaged in co-production. However, Solecki Fund can be shown as an excellent example of citizens’ engagement. It is presented a possible agenda on what can be done to make co-production more popular and used on a regular basis not only in metropolitan but also rural areas.

 

Tags: co-production public services public management public policy public administration

Continue reading

Author: Wojciech Michnik
E-mail: wmichnik@gmail.com
Institution: American University in the Emirates (UAE)
Year of publication: 2018
Source: Show
Pages: 123–125
DOI Number: http://dx.doi.org/10.15804/ppsy2018109
PDF: ppsy/47-1/ppsy2018109.pdf

Abstract:

The seminar focused on the Security Challenges in Central Europe organised by PPSY was held in Toruń on February 21, 2017. The leading topic of this event could not have been apter as the last years in the region brought back serious questions about stability and security of the region. From the domestic challenges – like the rise of populist movements; to more resurgent foreign policy of Russian Federation; instability of so-called Eastern flank; through the questions about coherence of both NATO and the European Union – Central European states found themselves in a situation unprecedented since the end of the Cold War. It can be even argued that Central Europe come to strategic crossroads that would determine future of the regions and its countries in particular.

Tags: national security Central Europe cybersecurity energy security security studies conference report

Continue reading

  • 1
  • 2

Message to:

 

 

© 2017 Adam Marszałek Publishing House. All rights reserved.

Projekt i wykonanie Pollyart

Korzystając z naszej strony, wyrażasz zgodę na wykorzystywanie przez nas plików cookies . Zaktualizowaliśmy naszą politykę przetwarzania danych osobowych (RODO). Więcej o samym RODO dowiesz się tutaj.