Author: Frantisek Sudzina
Institution: Aalborg University
Author: Liana Razmerita
Institution: Copenhagen Business School
Author: Kathrin Kirchner
Institution: University Hospital Jena
Year of publication: 2014
Source: Show
Pages: 17-28
DOI Address: https://doi.org/10.15804/tner.2014.35.1.01
PDF: tner/201401/tner3501.pdf

Educational on-line games are promising for new generations of students who are grown up digital. The new generations of students are technology savvy and spend lots of time on the web and on social networks. Based on an exploratory study, this article investigates the factors that influence students’ willingness to participate in serious games for teaching/learning. This study investigates the relationship between students’ behavior on Facebook, Facebook games, and their attitude toward educational on-line games. The results of the study reveal that the early adopters of educational games are likely to be students, who are young, have only a few Facebook connections, who currently play Facebook game(s). Furthermore, the study emphasizes that there may be differences between students coming from various countries.

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