Author: Bihong Li
Institution: Hunan University
Author: Pamela L. Eddy
Institution: The College of William and Mary
Year of publication: 2014
Source: Show
Pages: 88-100
DOI Address: https://doi.org/10.15804/tner.14.35.1.07
PDF: tner/201401/tner3507.pdf

While discussion on faculty development in China has been increasing in recent years, our understanding of the strategy for the development remains limited. This study with a survey aimed to examine whether e-learning could meet faculty members’ expectations for their professional development. Our findings suggest that e-learning is identified as a preferred means of opening new opportunities to meet the needs of faculty in China where faculty development still remains traditional training and it has bright prospects. The result also highlights individual perspectives as a critical factor shaping e-learning behavior, and provides implications for the policy of faculty development.

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