reform

  • Education Reform – cui bono?

    Author: Maria Czerepaniak-Walczak
    E-mail: malwa_1@interia.eu
    Institution: University of Szczecin
    Year of publication: 2019
    Source: Show
    Pages: 185-194
    DOI Address: https://doi.org/10.15804/tner.2019.55.1.15
    PDF: tner/201901/tner5515.pdf

    In the text, types of reforms to formal education are introduced, and against this background, an answer is sought to the question of who they serve, who is interested in this multi-layered effort, who is or can be a beneficiary and who is a loser in this process. The central part of the text is a presentation of types of the reform. Then, the effects of reforming education are indicated. The conclusion underlines the importance of research in the process of reform, in the action, as a professional practice of integrating cognition and change.

  • Uwarunkowania instytucjonalno-prawne wyborów samorządowych na Ukrainie w 2015 roku

    Author: Liana Hurska-Kowalczyk
    E-mail: gliana@op.pl
    Institution: Uniwersytet Szczeciński
    ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6753-8989
    Year of publication: 2019
    Source: Show
    Pages: 40-57
    DOI Address: https://doi.org/10.15804/npw20192104
    PDF: npw/21/npw2104.pdf

    Institutional and legal conditions of local elections in Ukraine in 2015

    In this article the author analyzes the institutional and legal conditions of local “government” elections in Ukraine in 2015. Special attention is given to the determinants of formal elections to local government bodies. Indicates the specific nature of the local elections in 2015 (up today). The local elections in Ukraine in 2015 were held under the conditions of reforming local self-government. The main goal of the reform is the socalled decentralization. Local government reforms ensure the creation of associations of territorial communities of villages (cities, settlements). For the first time in the elections they took part association of territorial communities. In addition, the Ukrainian authorities have failed to conduct elections on the entire territory of the country. No votes were cast in Autonomous Republic of Crimea, due to the annexation of the peninsula by the Russian Federation in 2014. Elections to local self-government bodies were also not carried out in part of the Donetsk and Luhansk regions, due to the ongoing armed conflict in Donbass since 2014.

  • Local Government Policy in the Field of Education and Health in Poland after 2015

    Author: Paweł Grzywna
    Institution: University of Silesia in Katowice
    Author: Natalia Stępień-Lampa
    Institution: University of Silesia in Katowice
    Year of publication: 2019
    Source: Show
    Pages: 117-133
    DOI Address: https://doi.org/10.15804/athena.2019.63.08
    PDF: apsp/63/apsp6308.pdf

    The considerations in the article focus on the role of territorial local government in two important spheres of welfare state – in providing access to education, and health care. The authors characterize the situation in Poland after the parliamentary elections won in 2015 by the Law and Justice (PiS). The first part of the study analyses the reforms undertaken in the education system and their consequences for territorial local government, in particular increasing the compulsory education age as well as changing the school system. The second part contains a description of planned and implemented changes in health care.

  • Challenges of Georgia’s Pension System

    Author: Jaba Urotadze
    E-mail: jaba.urotadze@tsu.ge
    Institution: Iv. Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University, Georgia
    ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5567-0595
    Year of publication: 2020
    Source: Show
    Pages: 171-185
    DOI Address: https://doi.org/10.15804/ppsy2020311
    PDF: ppsy/49-3/ppsy2020311.pdf

    In 2018, a mandatory funded pension model (second pillar) was introduced in Georgia. At present, the Georgian pension system has three pillars, but the reform does not apply to current pensioners. If society does not trust all three pillars, the chances of reversing the pension reform will rise for two reasons. First, the replacement rate from the first pillar (state redistributive pension) is much lower than in any of the OECD member states. Second, for the majority of participants of the second pillar, pension payments will start in 20-25 years’ time. Such a long period creates uncertainty for many about whether long-term economic growth will be achieved, which in turn would make possible an adequate level of retirement income. This paper attempts to identify means of increasing replacement rates for the state redistributive pension and coverage of the voluntary funded third pillar. The research provides recommendations to enhance the Georgian pension system.

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