the Czech Republic

  • The Uncompleted Revolution? The Communist Party of Bohemia and Moravia in the Post–Communist Reality

    Author: Marcin Czyżniewski
    E-mail: mcz@umk.pl
    Institution: Nicolaus Copernicus University in Toruń (Poland)
    Year of publication: 2016
    Source: Show
    Pages: 60-72
    DOI Address: http://dx.doi.org/10.15804/ppsy2016005
    PDF: ppsy/45/ppsy2016005.pdf

    The change of the political regime in Czechoslovakia, called the Velvet Revolution, is considered as a success story of transformation after 1989. However, in nowadays Czech Republic, the Communist Party still exists – this is the only such case among democratic countries of Central Europe. It makes us ask the question: is the Velvet Revolution completed? The author treats the activities of the Communist Party of Bohemia and Moravia as a criterion for the assessment of changes in the Czech Republic after 1989 and wonders how strong for the assessment of the transformation influences the relics of the former regime. He stresses that transformation in the Czech Republic can’t be assessed on a comparative scale, because pace and effects of changes were different in different countries, as different was the nature of the previous regimes. The author concludes that the existence of the Communist Party is the natural element of contemporary political reality of the Czech Republic, which negates the achievements of transformation in no way. 

  • Czech and Hungarian Constitutional Order in the Light of Comparative Analysis of the Perception of Democracy and its Stagnation

    Author: Sebastian Kubas
    E-mail: sebastian.kubaas@us.edu.pl
    Institution: The University of Silesia in Katowice
    ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7609-4002
    Year of publication: 2019
    Source: Show
    Pages: 391-405
    DOI Address: https://doi.org/10.15804/ppk.2019.05.26
    PDF: ppk/51/ppk5126.pdf

    Contemporary democratization process challenges the trends of regress or stagnation in the world. The Central European Countries face this problem as well, yet they differ in the depth of changes. The article addresses the problems of quality of democracy regarded as a political regime and the values of constitutional order of the Czech Republic and Hungary. As post-communist, the two countries have been regarded as democratic leaders for a long time. But the Czech Republic has the same Constitution from the beginning of democratization process, while Hungary passed the new Constitution in 2011. The Czech constitutional order reflects liberal democratic rules and values both in axiological and institutional dimension. The Hungarian one mirrors conservative and illiberal axiological values. In the institutional dimension both constitutions seem to maintain specific democratic regime, but in Hungary the executive power is dominant. The methods used in the research were: analysis, synthesis, institutional approach and comparative method.

  • Language as an Element of Identity: Language of National Minorities in the Educational Systems of Belarus, the Czech Republic, Poland, and Ukraine

    Author: Barbara Grabowska
    E-mail: basiagra@wp.pl
    Institution: University of Silesia in Katowice, Poland
    ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2558-0294
    Author: Łukasz Kwadrans
    E-mail: lukaszkwadrans@poczta.fm
    Institution: University of Silesia in Katowice, Poland
    ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6102-2308
    Year of publication: 2020
    Source: Show
    Pages: 43-59
    DOI Address: https://doi.org/10.15804/kie.2020.04.03
    PDF: kie/130/kie13003.pdf

    Life in a culturally diverse environment and being a national minority member causes the socialization of young people to occur in more than one language. Language is not only a medium of culture but also a core element of identity. This article discusses the implementation of the right of national minorities to education in their languages. In Belarus, the Czech Republic, Poland, and Ukraine, there are national minorities of autochthonous character, along with schools with the language of a particular minority as the teaching language. The most developed and numerous network of schools operating in the official school system is in the Czech Republic. In Belarus and Ukraine, the legal possibility of opening and running minority schools was introduced several years ago. Not without significance is the functioning of parish schools, Saturday-Sunday schools, national or ethnic clubs. Apart from family, school is the basic place of learning the minority language, an important element of national identity. At school, learners deepen their cultural competences, within their national, majority group and European culture.

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