university

  • Students’ Expectations of Higher Educational Experience in Public vs. Private Universities in Indonesia

    Author: Nuri Wulandari
    Institution: Indonesia Banking School in Jakarta
    Author: Johan W de Jager
    Institution: Tshwane University of Technology in Pretoria
    Year of publication: 2018
    Source: Show
    Pages: 146-156
    DOI Address: https://doi.org/10.15804/tner.2018.54.4.12
    PDF: tner/201804/tner5412.pdf

    In the education industry, it is critical to understand the expectations of students concerning providing the best educational experience. Thus, in higher education institutions (HEI) the adoption of customer-oriented approaches in the management practice is widespread. The customer-oriented approach regarding students as customers has been discussed in academic literature from several perspectives. However, it has been rarely studied from the point of view of comparing public and private universities. The presented study tried to apply a student-customer orientation questionnaire (SCOQ) to investigate differences between student expectations of their educational experience in public vs. private universities. The sample consisted of 238 undergraduate students in Indonesia’s higher education institutions. The study found interesting differences within the student-customer-oriented variables between university types in terms of graduation, curriculum design, communication with service staff, classroom studies, individual studies and course design.

  • Uniwersytet jako czynnik konsolidacji społeczeństwai państwa polskiego (1907–2007)

    Author: Roman Tomaszewski
    Institution: Akademia Pomorska w Słupsku
    Year of publication: 2019
    Source: Show
    Pages: 89-122
    DOI Address: https://doi.org/10.15804/ksm201906
    PDF: ksm/24/ksm201906.pdf

    The school protest in the Polish part of Russia and Germany that took place in 1907 forced young Poles to educational emigration. In Galicia, Polish-language academic institutions have developed a new elite. Together with Polish graduates of Western European universities turned out to be the main factor consolidating society around the idea of rebuilding the state. In the revived Second Republic of Poland, academic circles proved a counterbalance to autocratic rule in 1926-1939. The more so because the number of universities increased from 8 to 32 and they represented a high, world class level of education. After 1945, the rapid reconstruction of Polish universities and the consolidation of the academic community have prevented the communists from taking over higher education. In addition, after the turn of 1956, the autonomy of Polish universities was expanded despite the riots in 1968. Martial law and the breakdown of Solidarność resulted in taking over the function of socio-political opposition by academic circles up to 1989. In turn, the breakthrough made at that time was also thank to Polish elites, but at the same time led to a rapid development of the number of universities and the birth of academic capitalism. An attempt to violate the autonomy of universities in 2005-2007 stimulated the academic community and contributed to the collapse of the PiS government in 2007. Universities and the elites educated in them are in the long run more important for society than the institution of the state, material or economic resources, or armed forces. From this perspective, the Polish case confirms the proposed thesis and the visibility of the third function: supporting democratization processes in the society.

  • “Patavium virum me fecit” – Padova come luogo di formazione delle antiche élite polacche

    Author: Wojciech Tygielski
    E-mail: wojciech.tygielski@adm.uw.edu.pl
    Institution: Uniwersytet Warszawski, Polonia
    ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6654-6001
    Year of publication: 2021
    Source: Show
    Pages: 21-46
    DOI Address: https://doi.org/10.15804/IW.2021.12.1.02
    PDF: iw/12_1/iw12102.pdf

    Using the Atti della Nazione Polacca at the University of Padua as a main source, the author describes the role that this university played in the education of students from the PolishLithuanian Commonwealth from the 16th to 18th centuries. According to the author’s research, this role was crucial in the 16th century, when a significant part of Polish elites included a stay at this university in their curriculum. In the 17th century, the number of students from Poland-Lithuania studying in Padua decreased slowly but continuously, and in the 18th century, the number was marginal. In the period under discussion, the social structure of this group significantly changed: students looking to acquire knowledge that was necessary for their future professional career were gradually replaced by young men of aristocratic and noble families, for whom a visit in Padua, be it long or short, was only a stage in their educational European Grand Tour. According to the author, this can be explained by intellectual changes in Polish-Lithuanian society: a general and rather superficial education was gradually preferred to university-based and professionally-provided knowledge. A study of selected travel diaries supplemented and confirmed the results of the presented statistical analysis. All Polish travellers visiting Padua in the 16th and 17th centuries described the University and considered it as the most important institution of the city; meetings with compatriot students were also often mentioned. Later on, the University was no longer the obvious subject of the descriptions and 18th-century travellers often did not even mention it at all. Nevertheless, there is still available evidence that the Polish presence in Padua, although reduced, was visible and important for the city.

  • Padova nei periodici polacchi tra la fine del XIX sec. e il 1939

    Author: Jadwiga Miszalska
    E-mail: jadwiga.miszalska@uj.edu.pl
    Institution: Uniwersytet Jagielloński w Krakowie, Polonia
    ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7122-9396
    Year of publication: 2021
    Source: Show
    Pages: 161-175
    DOI Address: https://doi.org/10.15804/IW.2021.12.1.09
    PDF: iw/12_1/iw12109.pdf

    Italy, seen as the cradle of European culture and the destination of the wanderings of Polish intellectuals and artists, often appears in the Polish press of the late-19th and early-20th centuries. Among the cities described, Padua is present, although it appears less frequently than Venice or Rome. Articles dedicated to this city, however, have a particular character, because not only is “Padova la dotta” famous for the cult of Saint Anthony, but it is most often presented in the contexts of centuriesold Italian-Polish relations linked mostly to the University and of the Paduan polonica. There are in fact two moments that find a particular resonance in the Polish press: the first, in 1922, for the seventh centenary of the University, and the second, in 1931, for the celebrations of the seventh centenary of Saint Anthony’s death. This article offers a review of the texts that have appeared in various periodicals and includes a brief presentation of the authors—scholars, artists, or journalists active in the promotion of Italian culture. From the texts published both in newspapers and in cultural magazines or even scientific periodicals, the image of the city emerges as strongly marked by the presence of Poles, who were students, university professors, or pilgrims.

  • Student Spatial Practices and the Transformation of Private Space in Relation to Remote University Education

    Author: Małgorzata Skowrońska
    E-mail: malskow@gmail.com
    Institution: University of Białystok
    ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4882-1620
    Author: Urszula Abłażewicz-Górnicka
    Institution: University of Białystok
    ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4261-9093
    Year of publication: 2021
    Source: Show
    Pages: 25-39
    DOI Address: https://doi.org/10.15804/kie.2021.02.02
    PDF: kie/132/kie13202.pdf

    The article presents an analysis of the transformations in private space and spatial practices manifested by students in connection with long-term online university education during the COVID-19 pandemic. The text includes a presentation of the results of a series of four focus group interviews carried out in 2021 via Zoom platform with students drawn from a few Polish colleges. The research sample was diversified in terms of gender, field of study, type of college, and mode of study. The research suggests key dimensions shaping the experience of remote university study: the spatial dimension, technological dimension and the organisational-educational dimension. Four basic kinds of student experiences are presented as well. The analyses also include a description of spatial practices such as: changing or adapting space for remote university education, negotiating spatial boundaries and attempts to ameliorate conflicts resulting from the interaction of diverse social roles and institutional orders in the same domestic space.

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