Between Provocation and Experiment. Technical Reports and the Ecology of Scholarly Communication in the Humanities

Author: Piotr Marecki
Institution: Jagiellonian University
Year of publication: 2015
Source: Show
Pages: 169-181
DOI Address: https://doi.org/10.15804/kie.2015.04.10
PDF: kie/110/kie11010.pdf

The aim of this paper is to describe a genre that is gaining importance in contemporary humanities, and especially in its areas devoted to digital media – the technical report. Technical reports are discussed as part of the larger trend of open notebook science. This form of communication draws from experiences worked out in the field of technology, computer science and science. In this understanding technical reports are a genre of gray literature, a form dedicated to communicating results of research projects conducted by laboratories. The case study discussed in this text is devoted to a series of technical reports from the MIT Trope Tank lab, which are interpreted in the light of a manifestotext for this form of communication, Beyond the Journal and the Blog. The Technical Report for Communication in the Humanities, published by Nick Montfort. One of the aims of the article is also to contextualize technical reports against the background of other forms and methods of communication in laboratories from the field of contemporary humanities (including blogs, brochures, lab notebooks).

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