Scotland

  • The Political Myth of Margaret Thatcher in Scotland

    Author: Tomasz Czapiewski
    E-mail: tomekczapiewski@gmail.com
    Institution: University of Szczecin (Poland)
    Year of publication: 2016
    Source: Show
    Pages: 85-98
    DOI Address: http://dx.doi.org/10.15804/ppsy2016007
    PDF: ppsy/45/ppsy2016007.pdf

    The article describes and explains the phenomenon of the political myth of Margaret Thatcher – her anti–Scottish attitude and policies and its impact on the process of decomposition of the United Kingdom. The author indicates that the view of Margaret Thatcher’s dominance in Scotland is simplified, stripped of complexity, ignoring significant information conflicting with the thesis, but that also plays an important role in current politics, legitimizing secessionist demands and strengthening the identity of the Scottish community. In the contemporary Scottish debate with its unequivocal defence policy of Thatcher is outside of the discourse, proving its sanctity status. Thatcher could see this special Scottish dimension within the United Kingdom, but treated it rather as a delay in the reforms needed in the country. There are many counterarguments to the validity of the Thatcher myth. Firstly, many negative processes that took place in the 80s were not initiated by Thatcher, only accelerated. Secondly, the Tory decline in popularity in the north began before the leadership of Thatcher and has lasted long after her dismissal. The Conservative Party was permanently seen in Scotland as openly English. Thirdly, there is a lot of accuracy in the opinion that the real division is not between Scotland and England, only between southern England and the rest of the country. Widespread opinion that Thatcher was hostile to Scotland is to a large extent untruthful. She has never retreated radically from any of the Scottish privileges, such as the Barnett formula or the Scottish Development Agency. 

  • SCOTL AND AT THE CROSSROADS: FROM BREXIT TO NEVERRENDUM

    Author: Tomasz Czapiewski
    E-mail: tomasz.czapiewski@usz.edu.pl
    Institution: University of Szczecin
    Year of publication: 2016
    Source: Show
    Pages: 11-25
    DOI Address: https://doi.org/10.15804/rop201601
    PDF: rop/2016/rop201601.pdf

    This article aims to describe the possible variants of the course of events after Brexit, from a Scottish perspective. Three dimensions are taken into the account: future model of UK–EU relations, symmetry of Brexit inside the UK and possibility of the second independence referendum in the near future (less than five years). These dimension have allowed to distinguish three main variants of further development, that are in short named by the author as: passive variant, Scottish exception and another referendum. It seems at this point that the Scottish Government is bound to carry out the second referendum, especially if the British government chooses a variant of the so-called hard Brexit. The European argument, which is so often used by Sturgeon in political debate does not necessarily lead to an increase in support for the independence, especially when eventual membership in the European Union of an independent Scotland is burdened with so many question marks.

  • SCOTLAND AT THE CROSSROADS BETWEEN THE EUROPEAN UNION AND THE UNITED KINGDOM

    Author: Tomasz Czapiewski
    Institution: University of Szczecin
    Year of publication: 2013
    Source: Show
    Pages: 29-43
    DOI Address: -
    PDF: rop/2013/rop201302.pdf

    Scottish Independence Referendum will take place on 18 September 2014. There would be only one question during referendum: “Should Scotland be an independent country? The reform of devolution established by Scotland Act 2012 is sometimes overlooked by observers as too little too late. The most principal issues of the referendum will be: economy, oil resources, currency, defense and European Union. Main doubt around referendum is whether Scotland would be better economically after Independence. Scotland’s position within the EU is likely to be shaped more by any agreements between the parties than by pre-existing principles of EU law.
    Doubts about Scottish membership in the EU have to be viewed in the context of the referendum on the UK’s membership in the European Union, that will take place if the Conservative Party wins the 2015. British political class have always behaved differently towards the European integration than continental elites The importance of the European dimension of the Scottish Independence Referendum was proved by Panelbase poll in May 2013.

  • Brexit, Devolution and Scottish Independence. Political and Legal Impact of the Sewel Convention in the UK

    Author: Cyprian Liske
    E-mail: Cyprian_liske@o2.pl
    Institution: Jagiellonian University
    ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8701-3581
    Year of publication: 2019
    Source: Show
    Pages: 253-266
    DOI Address: https://doi.org/10.15804/ppk.2019.06.19
    PDF: ppk/52/ppk5219.pdf

    The upcoming withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the European Union is a source of tensions within the political system of the UK. Devolution is most likely to be affected by Brexit which can lead to conflicts between the UK as a whole and Scotland as its part. The Sewel Convention is a political constitutional norm establishing non-legal rules of cooperation between these two political bodies. Despite having been written in a statute, the Sewel Convention remains unenforceable by the courts. Nonetheless, the political consequences of diminishing it may be severe. The discrepancy between the political strength of Scottish nationalism, confirmed in the latest general election, and constitutional lack of Scottish “voice” in regard to Brexit may lead to a severe political crisis within the UK.

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